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2 edition of Investigations on the hydrogen-ion concentration of oil-in-water type of emulsion. found in the catalog.

Investigations on the hydrogen-ion concentration of oil-in-water type of emulsion.

Mary Beardshaw Watson

Investigations on the hydrogen-ion concentration of oil-in-water type of emulsion.

by Mary Beardshaw Watson

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Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M. Sc.)--The Queen"s University of Belfast, 1935.

The Physical Object
Pagination1 v
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19799806M

The spray drying of protein-based oil-in-water (o / w) emulsions is a common task in food engineering to produce a wide variety of products including infant formula, coffee creamers, and instant dairy l formulations include a protein source such as whey or casein, an oil phase (e.g., milk fat or blends of vegetable oils), and a carbohydrate source (e.g., maltodextrin). concentration of oil-in-water emulsions. According to the figure 6, the samples with concentrations 2 ppm and 5 ppm have high repeatability estimative values (4,17 e 3,71, respectively). Figure 6. Measurement precision on ultrasonic velocity.

This paper investigates the surface film adsorption and lubricity of two different types of potential environmentally friendly cold metal forming lubricants: soybean vegetable oil in water VO/W emulsions and triblock copolymer aqueous solutions. The lubricants have different visual appearance, surface film adsorption characteristic, lubricity and surface cleaning behaviour.   The oil-in-water emulsions were stabilized by various surface-active compounds, CTAB, SDS or Tw giving differently charged droplets. Two strains with different surface characteristics were added to the emulsion.

Types of Emulsion. Depending upon the nature of the dispersed phase, the emulsions are classified as; (i) Oil-in-water emulsions (O/W): The emulsion in which oil is present as the dispersed phase and water as the dispersion medium (continuous phase) is called an oil-in-water emulsion. Milk is an example of the oil-in-water type of emulsion.   For batch emulsions prepared at pH , oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions are formed that are stable to coalescence but exhibit creaming. Below pH , however, these emulsions are very unstable to coalescence and rapid phase separation occurs just after homogenization (pH-dependent).


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Investigations on the hydrogen-ion concentration of oil-in-water type of emulsion by Mary Beardshaw Watson Download PDF EPUB FB2

The effect of CFV on permeate flux and oil rejection for PES-5 at mg/L oil concentration in feed is shown in Fig. The flux of pure water shows a positive correlation while oil rejection shows a negative correlation with CFV indicating the existence of an optimum CFV that can be found out through a pilot run.

A balance has to be struck between fixing the CFV and TMP as can be seen. Wear, () A dynamic concentration model for lubrication with oil-in-water emulsions W. Wilson, Y. Sakaguchi* and S. Schmid Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (USA) (Received J ; accepted Septem ) Abstract A variety of models for lubrication by emulsions are compared with Cited by: The effect of surfactant concentration and volume fraction on emulsion stability is studied by two ratios of water-in-oil emulsions that; and % water-in-oil emulsions.

It found that as the volume fraction (φ) decreases, the separation time for water to separate from the emulsion decreased.

Oil-in-Water Emulsions. Used in moisturizing products and food products such as milk, mayonnaise and vinaigrette, o/w emulsions contain a low oil concentration. They are mixable with water, non-greasy, non-occlusive and will absorb water. The dispersion medium in these emulsions is water; o/w emulsifiers keep oil drops packed in water.

The effect of hydrogen‐ion concentration upon emulsions. found that NaCl tended to stabilize oil-in-water emulsions but had no influence on water-in-oil emulsions Lowe () suggested that. The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, published by Wiley on behalf of The Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering, is the forum for publication of high quality original research articles, new theoretical interpretation or experimental findings and critical reviews in the science or industrial practice of chemical and biochemical processes.

Moreover, increasing the oil content in oil-in-water emulsion can change the type of emulsion from oil-in-water emulsion to water-in-oil emulsion, which is more stable due to high concentration of oil in continuous phase (Ahmed et al., ).

Sometimes, the emulsion is formed for transportation purposes by reducing the viscous of mixture. what are the existing methods for preparations of emulsions and how to make simple emulsions. Background of This Report Emulsion is a kind of mixture comprised of two or more liquids, which usually are immiscible, and surfactant.

The common types of emulsions are oil-in-water emulsion and water-in-oil emulsion. Emulsion Formation, Stability, and Rheology Tharwat F. Tadros Introduction Emulsions are a class of disperse systems consisting of two immiscible liquids [1–3].

The liquid droplets (the disperse phase) are dispersed in a liquid medium (the continuous phase). Several classes may be distinguished: oil-in-water. Stable multiple of type O 1 /W/O 2 emulsions with the internal average droplets size being 5–10 μm and a membrane liquid phase 30–40 μm were formed with conditions described by the energy dissipation rate ranging from to W/kg.

The microcapsules obtained by multiple emulsion stabilization have an average diameter about 30 μm. water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) and oil-in-water-in-oil (O/W/O) emulsions. Most industrial applications utilize W/O/W emulsions, whereas the applicability of O/W/ O emulsions is still limited, mainly due to solubility issues.

W/O/W emulsions have attracted a great deal of interest for various applications, including foods,2) pharmaceuticals,3. These emulsions coarsened with time to produce a fraction of large droplets that grow at the expense of smaller droplets.

This resulted in a decrease in yield stress and eventually to visible phase separation of water. There was a significant effect of emulsifier type, and the optimum HLB appears to be ∼5 for mineral oil.

A series of alkyl chain modified graphene oxides (AmGO) with different alkyl chain length and content was fabricated using a reducing reaction between graphene oxide (GO) and alkyl amine.

Then AmGO was used as a graphene-based particle emulsifier to stabilize Pickering emulsion. Compared with the emulsion stabilized by GO, which was oil-in-water type, all the emulsions stabilized by AmGO were. Recently, a series of more complex and structured emulsions have been developed.

One of these is double emulsions, also called multiple emulsions, which consist of two types: water-in-oil-in-water (W 1 /O/W 2) emulsions and oil-in-water-in-oil (O 1 /W/O 2) emulsions. An equi volume mixture of emulsion and n-hexane (Crude oil dissolves in hexane, more miscible solvent) and it is mixed well.

Then the hexane is used for the estimation of crude oil. Essential oil compounds (EOCs) are molecules with well-known antimicrobial and antipest activity. However, such molecules possess limited solubility in water, making their handling difficult.

This work aimed to enhance the distribution of a solid essential oil compound, thymol, using oil-in-water (o/w) microemulsions for its solubilization. The use of mixtures formed by an alkyl polyglucoside.

12 to O/W (oil in water) emulsifier 16 to solubiliser or hydrotrope Tween 20 () seems like a better choice as it can act as a solubiliser or O/W emulsifier compare to Tween Tests for Identification of Emulsion Types: • Dilution test: emulsion can be diluted only with external phase controlling the type of emulsion that is to be formed: oil in water (O/W) or water in oil (W/O) concentration: surfactant concentration: Comminution by Ultrasound - A Practical Example 2.

There are two basic types of emulsions, that is, oil in water (O/W) and water in oil (W/O). In addition to these two types, a relatively complex emulsion, called multiple emulsions can also be. An Oil-Water Emulsion, also known as oil emulsion mud or oil in water emulsion mud is a type of emulsified mud used in the drilling operations which is formed when water is in a continuous phase and oil is in a dispersed phase.

It is different from oil base mud in the fact that it has oil in the continuous phase and water in the dispersed phase. Emulsions were chosen that were formed in lower energy.

shakers and at least two weeks old, so that they were known to be stable. As well, several different emulsions were used. The samples were centrifuged for one hour, the. oil and water removed and weighed, then the emulsion layer was stirred and centrifuged.This paper describes an investigation of the effect of pH on the antioxidant and antibacterial properties of caffeic acid in different media.

The pH values studied, using an oil-in-water emulsion as model system, were 3, 5 (with and without phosphate buffer), and 9.Kundu et al. () studied the effect on PIT of an oil-in-water emulsion stabilized by anionic surfactant. Moreover, Kale and Deore () also showed the influence on PIT of an oil-in-water.